Scottish Oceans Institute: Current seminars

28 Mar 2017
1:00 PM
Dyers Brae
Seminar Room

CBD Seminar: No fly is an island: How Drosophila respond to socio-sexual environments
Amanda Bretman
University of Leeds

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We all modify our behaviour in different social situations to adapt, fit in or to become more competitive. Fruit flies also have complex social lives, aggregating independently of any resources, engaging in social learning, forming social networks and having a genetic propensity for different types of social environments. Using Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies as a model, we can investigate both the fitness consequences of changes of social environment and the mechanisms by which individuals can respond to such changes.


One aspect of the social environment that has a particular impact on males is how much mating competition (both before and after mating) they encounter. Theory predicts that if males can mate more than once they need to trade-off current and future mating opportunities, hence they should modify their mating effort at a particular mating depending on the amount of competition they face. Males of many species use plastic strategies to cope with this uncertainty, taking cues from the presence of other males or the mating status of females, and making adjustments to behaviour and ejaculate content accordingly. In D. melanogaster, after being exposed to a potential competitor, males mate for longer and transfer a higher quality ejaculate. This has fitness benefits, at least in the short term, but is costly. By combining behavioural and life history data with transgenics and transcriptomics, we can investigate how such responses are coordinated and regulated, an important step in understanding how sophisticated, flexible social behaviours evolve. We are also starting to use this paradigm to investigate other consequences of social contact on traits such as ageing, immunity and cognition.

http://www.fbs.leeds.ac.uk/staff/profile.php?tag=Bretman_A

host: ecg5@st-andrews.ac.uk

refID: 1850

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30 Mar 2017
7:00 PM
Other
School 2, St Salvator's Quad

Wildlife Society Global Conservation Seminar: Where Will Global Conservation be in 50 Years?

St Andrews Wildlife Conservation Society

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06 Apr 2017
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture theatre D

SOI seminar: Skilful predictions of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)
Dr Nick Dunstone
Met Office

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The winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is the primary mode of atmospheric variability in the North Atlantic sector. It has a profound impact on surface conditions over the North Atlantic ocean and temperature & precipitation over Europe and North America. The NAO exhibits pronounced interannual variability, particularly in the last decade, with strong positive NAO leading to mild & stormy European winters (e.g. 2011/12, 2013/14) and strong negative NAO winters giving cold & dry winters (e.g. 2009/10, 2010/11). Until recently seasonal forecasting systems have had no significant skill in predicting the winter NAO, leading many to assume that the NAO was largely a chaotic mode of atmospheric variability and inherently unpredictable. Here I will outline our recent work using the Met Office high-resolution climate models to show that the NAO is indeed predictable both one month ahead of winter and that significant skill still remains one year ahead. I will  examine the drivers of predictability on these two timescales and show that the discovery of NAO predictability is at odds with the skill of the model predicting itself. This surprising result indicates that the real-world is in fact far more predictable than we previously thought and it is likely that even the latest high-resolution climate models are unable to realistically represent the physical processes and feedbacks operating in the real world, resulting in too little signal and/or too much noise. Finally, I show how these new skilful NAO predictions are beginning to be used to aid decision making in government and industry.

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/research/people/nick-dunstone

host: Prof Chris Todd

refID: 1862

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07 Apr 2017
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

CBD Seminar: The origins of biodiversity: evolution and development
Linda Holland
University of California, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

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Emeritus Professor and recipient of the prestigious Kowalevsky Medal for joint work with her husband for distinguished achievements in evolutionary developmental biology and comparative zoology.

http://scrippsscholars.ucsd.edu/lzholland/biocv

host: ecg5@st-andrews.ac.uk

refID: 1891

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13 Apr 2017
1:00 PM
BMS

TBC
Petra Neveceralova
Charles University, Prague

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host: elc6@st-andrews.ac.uk

refID: 1863

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19 Apr 2017
1:00 PM
BMS
Lecture Theatre D

BSRC Seminar Series: Electroreceptor development, physiology and evolution: insights from paddlefish
Dr Clare Baker
Dept. of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge

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Director of Studies for Natural Sciences at Peterhouse College and researcher in the development and evolution of the vertebrate sensory nervous system.

http://www.pdn.cam.ac.uk/directory/clare-baker

host: Dr Ildiko Somorjai

refID: 1902

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27 Apr 2017
1:00 PM
Bute
LTD

Sea ice and zooplankton variability in the Arctic
Martin Doble
SAMS

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08 Jun 2017
1:00 PM
Bute
LTD

Mesopelagic fish: a 'dark hole' in our understanding of ocean ecolgy
Mike St John
DTU Aqua

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